Health Care Jobs Continue To Grow Faster Than The U.S. Economy

Jeffrey Young

jeffrey.young@huffingtonpost.com Posted: 12/07/2012 2:09 pm EST  |  Updated: 12/07/2012 3:14 pm EST

 

The overall recovery of the U.S. economy is still sluggish, but if you’re looking for work, you’d be wise to consider the health care sector.

The health care sector added 290,000 jobs this year through November, according to Bureau of Labor Statistics data compiled by the Advisory Board, a Washington-based consulting company. In the same time period, the economy added 1.7 million jobs in total. The jobs report issued Friday shows 20,000 new health care jobs added last month alone. Hospitals, nursing homes and various outpatient clinics like physician offices led the growth in health care jobs in November, the jobs report shows.

“Health care is adding several hundred thousand jobs a year regardless of what’s going on in the broader economy, but when the broader economy hits a tailspin, then that health care jobs growth stands out that much more,” said Dan Diamond, the managing editor of the Advisory Board’s Daily Briefing.

Over the last five years, health care job growth has outpaced employment trends overall. Health care jobs account for one out of every six of the jobs created in 2012 so far, according to HuffPost calculations.

Employment rose in the health care industry over the last six years, even as jobs disappeared overall during the Great Recession and have reappeared slowly since. Indeed, when the U.S. hemorrhaged jobs in 2008 and 2009, health care companies continued hiring, as this chart from the Advisory Board shows.

health care jobs
 

Via: The Advisory Board Company

 

Health Care Jobs

Health care jobs have outpaced employment trends over past five years. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)

The overall recovery of the U.S. economy is still sluggish, but if you’re looking for work, you’d be wise to consider the health care sector.

The health care sector added 290,000 jobs this year through November, according to Bureau of Labor Statistics data compiled by the Advisory Board, a Washington-based consulting company. In the same time period, the economy added 1.7 million jobs in total. The jobs report issued Friday shows 20,000 new health care jobs added last month alone. Hospitals, nursing homes and various outpatient clinics like physician offices led the growth in health care jobs in November, the jobs report shows.

“Health care is adding several hundred thousand jobs a year regardless of what’s going on in the broader economy, but when the broader economy hits a tailspin, then that health care jobs growth stands out that much more,” said Dan Diamond, the managing editor of the Advisory Board’s Daily Briefing.

Over the last five years, health care job growth has outpaced employment trends overall. Health care jobs account for one out of every six of the jobs created in 2012 so far, according to HuffPost calculations.

Employment rose in the health care industry over the last six years, even as jobs disappeared overall during the Great Recession and have reappeared slowly since. Indeed, when the U.S. hemorrhaged jobs in 2008 and 2009, health care companies continued hiring, as this chart from the Advisory Board shows.

The Altarum Institute, another health care consulting company, offered this broad perspective in a report published last month: “Since the start of the recession in December 2007, the health sector has added 1.4 million jobs for a cumulative growth of 10.1 percent, while nonhealth employment has fallen by 5.6 million jobs for a cumulative decline of 4.6 percent.”

“Health care is traditionally recession-proof,” Diamond said. That’s because no matter what else is going on in the economy, people get sick and injured. Studies show the rising costs of health care make it harder to get the treatments people need, but no one can totally forgo medical care. That’s a big reason why the health care sector hasn’t reported job losses in a month in more than nine years, Diamond said.

Demand for health care, and thus the need for more health care workers, is expected to keep growing. “That Baby Boomer population and the overall aging of the U.S. population is a key factor in demand,” Diamond said. In fact, health care will supplant retail to become the top source of jobs in the U.S. within two years if current trends continue, he said.

By 2020, there will be 5.6 million new health care jobs, according to a report published by Georgetown University’s Center on Education and Workforce this year. President Barack Obama’s health care reform law will have a “negligible” effect on health care job growth despite extending health insurance coverage to an estimated 30 million people by 2022, the Georgetown study concluded.

While this may amount to positive news for workers who find new jobs, it’s also a reflection of a bigger trend that’s not necessarily good for the U.S. economy: rising health care spending. The United States spent $2.7 trillion on health care last year, and the total tab is projected to reach $4.78 trillion, or 19.6 percent of the U.S. economy, by 2021, according to federal statistics released earlier this year.

Diamond acknowledged that rising health care spending is an area of concern, but noted hiring in this area also can be beneficial. “More money put into the health sector, in theory, can circulate throughout the broader economy,” Diamond said. “In a recovering economy, you don’t want to pick and choose the jobs that you’re getting.”

 

UT Southwestern names Hodges Assistant VP for Equal Opportunity and Minority Affairs

By Remekca Owens

Kimel Hodges has been named Assistant Vice President for Equal Opportunity and Minority Affairs at UT Southwestern Medical Center.

Kimel Hodges

Kimel Hodges

Ms. Hodges, who formerly served as Director for Diversity and Inclusion at CHRISTUS Health-Houston, will manage UT Southwestern’s institutional commitment to equal employment opportunity, minority affairs, and diversity and inclusion.

She also will serve as UTSW’s Historically Underutilized Business Coordinator, a key function in the university’s efforts to increase vendor diversity. Her core duties will focus on staff in administrative and support areas, as well as in UT Southwestern University Hospitals and Clinics.

Ms. Hodges will work closely with the Office of Human Resources and complement ongoing faculty diversity efforts led by Dr. Byron Cryer, Associate Dean for Faculty Diversity and Development. She reports to Ruben Esquivel, Vice President for Community and Corporate Relations.

“We’re delighted to have Ms. Hodges on board,” Mr. Esquivel said. “Her success has been stellar in the private sector and in a health care system, and we believe her efforts will really close the gap in our overall commitment to diversity and inclusion.”

Before gaining extensive work experience, including 11 years at the Kellogg Company in Battle Creek, Mich., Ms. Hodges developed her management and diversity skills as the youngest of 10 siblings in a farming family in Jamestown, Tenn. However, her approach to diversity is perhaps best characterized by her favorite holiday film “It’s a Wonderful Life,” the 1946 classic in which the value of every individual’s unique contribution to the world is lauded.

“It’s so important that people can come to work and feel valued. Diversity is not just about gender or ethnicity – it’s really about learning to value the whole being, including all of the talents he or she brings to an organization,” Ms. Hodges said.

Much of her effort will focus on education and awareness. “I find it very rewarding to see people have those ‘aha moments’ that eventually come to frame not only what diversity and inclusion mean to an institution, but also what it looks like every day.”

Ms. Hodges is a graduate of Western Michigan University, where she earned a bachelor’s degree in business. She later earned a master’s degree in human resources management from Central Michigan University.

President and CEO of Henry Ford Wyandotte Hospital Named

President and CEO of Henry Ford Wyandotte Hospital Named

DETROIT – Denise Brooks-Williams has been named as new president and chief executive officer for Henry Ford Wyandotte Hospital.

She begins her new position Feb. 4, 2013.

Brooks-Williams was formerly president and chief executive officer of Bronson Battle Creek in Battle Creek since July, 2011. Bronson Battle Creek is a 218-bed hospital known nationally for patient safety offering full service outpatient and inpatient acute care.

Prior to this time, Brooks-Williams was with Trinity Health from 2001 through 2011, where she was president and chief executive officer of Battle Creek Health System from April 2009 to June 2011, and earlier held other leadership positions with Trinity affiliate St. Joseph Mercy Oakland Hospital in Pontiac, including vice president of operations, ambulatory services, strategic business development, and physician network.

Before her employment at Trinity Health, Brooks-Williams also held leadership positions at the Detroit Medical Center and Mercy Hospital in Detroit. “Denise brings the talent and expertise that will help advance the excellent reputation Henry Ford Wyandotte Hospital currently maintains in the Downriver area,” says Bob Riney, president and COO of Henry Ford Health System.

“Denise comes to Henry Ford Health System with more than 20 years of progressive leadership experience in health care including operations, finance, new business development, marketing and program implementation.  Her experiences and background at other health care organizations align well with the culture, size and structure of Henry Ford Wyandotte Hospital,” adds Riney.

Brooks-Williams graduated from University of Michigan with a master’s of Health Services Administration degree. She is immediate past president and board member for the National Association of Health Services Executives and member of the University of Michigan School of Public Health, Department of Health Management and Policy board.

She has received numerous honors and awards including the 2010 Top 25 Minority Executives in Healthcare by Modern Healthcare magazine and was named Young Healthcare Executive of the Year by the National Association of Health Care Executives.

Brooks-Williams replaces James Sexton who announced his retirement earlier this year after serving ten years as president and CEO of Henry Ford Wyandotte Hospital.

 

ABOUT HENRY FORD WYANDOTTE HOSPITAL

Henry Ford Wyandotte Hospital was established in 1926.  This 401-bed acute care hospital serves the Downriver region and surrounding communities of southeast Michigan. It offers a full range of clinical services, including general medicine, surgery, birthing center and 24-hour emergency care. Henry Ford Wyandotte Hospital also provides physical medicine, rehab, adult mental health and neurosurgical services. Its Henry Ford Health Center-Brownstown offers medical imaging, ambulatory surgery, 24-hour emergency care, a sleep lab and other services. Henry Ford Wyandotte Hospital is a member of the Henry Ford Health System. For more information visit henryfordwyandotte.com